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Obesity Robs Years of Your Life

Avert Obesity Crisis, need for aggressive approach

As it relates to longevity, excess body fat robs victims of quality and quantity of life. People who are overweight or obese often have health problems that may increase the risk for heart disease. The obesity can be the cause to myriad other health problems in vicious cycle. They are high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar with hyperinsulinism and oestrogen dominant. In addition, excess weight may cause changes to your heart that make it work harder to send blood to all the cells in your body.

The obesity can be the cause to myriad other health problems in vicious cycle. They are high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar with hyperinsulinism and oestrogen dominant. In addition, excess weight may cause changes to your heart that make it work harder to send blood to all the cells in your body.

As deadly as cigarettes are, the explosive increase in the number of overweight/obese individuals is projected to create an even greater economic and health disaster.

Similar to the deferred effects of cigarette smoking, medical costs associated with obesity-related diseases are mostly postponed. This means that society has only begun to pay the enormous healthcare expenses that will accrue as overweight individuals succumb to cancer, vascular occlusion, kidney failure, diabetes, arthritis, early senility, and other illnesses.

Obesity As a Multi-factorial Disorder

The US Department of Agriculture released data showing that Americans consumed an extra 331 calories a day in 2006 compared to 1978.

If that number does not sound like a lot, just look how it quickly adds up. An extra 331 calories per day equals 2,317 calories each week or 120,000 extra calories in a year. This amount of excess food intake translates into roughly 15 pounds of stored body fat!

What is not recognized by conventional experts is that maturing humans lose the metabolic capacity to utilize even the limited number of calories they may be ingesting. A young person can eat a reasonable amount of food and efficiently convert these calories into energy with minimal residual fat storage. As that same person ages, they suffer a multitude of changes that impact body weight regulation such as hormone imbalance, insulin insensitivity, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decline in resting energy expenditure.

This means that even if we don’t consume a single calorie more at 45 years old compared to our food energy consumption at 25 years old, our aging physiology predisposes us to weight gain.

An understanding of the mechanisms involved in excess fat storage reveals why the advice to “just eat less” is doomed to fail over the long term.

The Age-Related Decrease in Cellular Energy Expenditure

We know that one factor involved in age-related weight gain is a decrease in resting energy expenditure at the cellular level. What this means in simple terms is that we are not burning fat as energy and instead are storing it in our adipocytes (fat cells).

Scientists have found that the decrease in energy expenditure with aging may cause 120-190 excess calories to be stored in the body every day. This translates to an extra 13-20 pounds of stored body fat each year.

Based on these data, the restoration of a more youthful metabolic rate is one critical factor in inducing weight loss in aging people. The encouraging news is that scientifically supported methods exist to correct many of the mechanisms that predispose us to accumulate excessive body fat.

Even more fascinating is new evidence that a proper weight loss program can enhance the expression of our longevity genes, slash disease risk, while adding healthy decades to their life spans.

Read more on how to lose weight.